12 Week Chin-Up Program

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12 Week Chin-Up Program

Ask any personal trainer or fitness enthusiast what they believe is one of the most difficult exercises and they will most definitely place the chin-up/pull-up at the top of the list. In fact, the vast majority of people are unable to perform even one full chin-up. Now there are a myriad of reasons for this, (obesity, lack of strength training and muscle development). However, one thing effects peoples’ ability to do a chin-up more than the rest, dedication. Trainees lack dedication to a specific goal. If they were to stay focused long enough, they would more than likely reap the benefits of their resolve. I have created a program that will guarantee your increased performance in the chin-up. My clients typically come from being able to do zero to being able to do 12 or more. The key is to stay focused and to not stray from your goal.

Note* You will be training in 3 phases (4 weeks each.) On the 3rd week of each phase, you will perform a deload week. You’ll decrease the volume of each exercise. This will allow you to properly recovery and achieve greater performance in week 4. When performing a chin-up or pull-up variation, you will be doing complete repetitions, meaning from a deep hang to chin at bar level. Zero cheating! Zero Kipping! These will impede improvements.

*Tempo training explanation: 20-0-1-2 = 20 sec. eccentric, 0 sec. at bottom position, 1 sec. concentric, 2 sec. at top position.

Before you being, I highly recommend you max out on chin-ups and write down how many you can do. Keep this record, you will want to see it later.

Phase 1 (weeks 1-4)

A1: Chin-Up (Neutral Grip)

  • Week 1: 5×1,  15-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 5×1 15-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2×1 15-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 5×1 15-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)

A2: Incline Bench Press

  • Week 1: 4 x 5, 5-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 4 x 5, 5-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2 x 5, 5-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 4 x 5, 5-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)

B1: Lat Pull-down

  • Week 1: 4 x 15, 4-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 4 x 15, 4-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2 x 15, 4-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 4 x 15, 4-0-1-1 (60 sec, rest)

B2. Cable Chest Flye

  • Week 1: 4 x 12, 3-1-1-1, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 4 x 12, 3-1-1-1, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2 x 12, 3-1-1-1, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 4 x 12, 3-1-1-1, (60 sec, rest)

C: Seated Dumbbell Curl

  • Week 1: 3 x 12, 4-0-1-2, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 3 x 12, 4-0-1-2, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2 x 12, 4-0-1-2, (60 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 3 x 12, 4-0-1-2, (60 sec, rest)

Phase 2 (weeks 5-8)

A1: Pull-Up

  • Week 5: 5 x 3, 7-0-1-0, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 6: 5 x 3, 7-0-1-0, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 7: 2 x 3, 7-0-1-0, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 8: 5 x 3, 7-0-1-0, (75 sec, rest)

*Note: Hands are shoulder-width apart and pronated.

A2: Incline Dumbbell Press

  • Week 5: 5 x 5, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 6: 5 x 5, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 7: 2 x 5, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 8: 5 x 5, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)

B1: One Arm Dumbbell Row

  • Week 5: 5 x 6, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 6: 5 x 6, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 7: 3 x 6, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 8: 5 x 6, 4-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)

B2: Pec Deck Flye

  • Week 5: 5 x 7, 4-0-2-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 6: 5 x 7, 4-0-2-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 7: 3 x 7, 4-0-2-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 8: 5 x 7, 4-0-2-1, (75 sec, rest)

C: Barbell Curl

  • Week 5: 4 x 8, 4-0-2-2, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 6: 4 x 8, 4-0-2-2, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 7: 2 x 8, 4-0-2-2, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 8: 4 x 8, 4-0-2-2, (75 sec, rest)

Phase 3 (weeks 9-12)

A1: Chin-Up (Supinated Narrow Grip)

  • Week 9: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 10: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 11: 2 x 5, 3-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 12: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, (75 sec, rest)

A2: Flat Bench Press

  • Week 9: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, rest 75 seconds
  • Week 10: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, rest 75 seconds
  • Week 11: 2 x 5, 3-0-1-1, rest 75 seconds
  • Week 12: 5 x 5, 3-0-1-1, rest 75 seconds

B1: V-Grip Pull-down

  • Week 9: 4 x 15, 3-0-1-1 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 10: 4 x 15, 3-0-1-1 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 11: 2 x 15, 3-0-1-1 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 12: 4 x 15, 3-0-1-1 c

B2: Dumbbell Bent-Arm Pull-over

  • Week 9: 4 x 12, 3-0-2-0 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 10: 4 x 12, 3-0-2-0 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 11: 2 x 12, 3-0-2-0 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 12: 4 x 12, 3-0-2-0 (75 sec, rest)

C1: Dumbbell Hammer Curl

  • Week 1: 5 x 6, 3-0-1-2 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 2: 5 x 6, 3-0-1-2 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 3: 2 x 6, 3-0-1-2 (75 sec, rest)
  • Week 4: 5 x 6, 3-0-1-2 (75 sec, rest)

After your 12 week program designed to significantly increase your ability to do chin-up, now is the time to re-test. I assure you, you will be please with your progress. Time to go rep em out.

http://www.paleopersonaltrainer.com/

The Role of L-Carnitine in Fat Burning and Exercise Recovery

anatomy

Carnitine is a quaternary ammonium compound biosynthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine. In living cells, it is required for the transport of fatty acids from the cytosol (intracellular fluid) into the mitochondria during the breakdown of lipids (fats) for the generation of metabolic energy. ( In laymen terms, it grabs the fats and carries them into the stove for fuel ) Carnitine exists in two stereoisomers: it’s biologically active form L-carnitine, ( the one we’re talking about) and the biologically inactive D-carnitine.

While most studies regarding the performance enhancing properties of L-carnitine have been centered around its role in mitochondrial β-oxidation, whereas supplementing with L-carnitine aided in fat burning.  New studies however, have investigated another mechanism by which supplementing with L-carnitine could positively impact exercise recovery. Through cardiovascular research, it has been found that L-carnitine also enhances endothelial function. (The endothelium is the thin layer of cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, forming an interface between circulating blood in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. The endothelium has many important functions such as vasoconstriction and dilation, blood clotting, and acts as a filter.) The hypothesis that L-carnitine supplementation may aide in exercise recovery is centered on improving blood flow to muscle tissues and decreasing hypoxic stress and its resulting sequelae (consequences). These studies have shown a decrease in markers of purine catabolism ( a byproduct of which is uric acid),  free radical generation and muscle soreness as a result of L-carnitine supplementation. Subsequently,  after direct assessment of muscle tissue damage via magnetic resonance imaging, it has been shown that L-carnitine does have the ability to reduce tissue damage related to hypoxic stress.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnitine

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075564